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Tips for Following Up Job Applications

Applying for care jobs doesn't with crafting a well developed application. Here are some useful tips for following up job applications after hitting send.

Applying for care jobs no longer ends with pouring time and effort into crafting a perfect Care.com profile and sending a well developed application.
 
You also need to be at the top of the application pile and at the forefront of the employer’s mind. The simplest way is to ensure you are at the top of their inbox!
 
Below are some useful tips for following up on your job applications to make sure you remain at the top through every step of the process.
 
Note: To send follow-up messages to employers you’ve already contacted through Care.com, go to the ‘Sent Items’ folder within ‘My Messages’ in your profile. If you click on the message thread between you and the employer, you’ll be able to send them another message.

 
After You Apply
Once you submit a job application through Care.com, here’s some advice on following up with the person hiring:

  • Timeline: If a week has passed and you haven’t had a response to your job application, then send across a follow-up message to the employer.
  • What to say: A professionally worded message is always appropriate. In your follow-up message, re-introduce yourself and restate your qualifications and why you’re a perfect fit for this job. If you feel comfortable, include your contact information and let the person know the time of day that is best to reach you. End your message by expressing your desire to present your qualifications during an interview.
  • Why it’s important: Following up on your application is the extra step that will let potential employers know you’re genuinely interested in the position. And it may help your application rise to the top of the pile as the process of interviews begins.

 
After Your Interview
You’ve made it to the interview stage — congratulations! But what should you do once the in-person or phone interview is over?

  • Timeline: Send a message immediately and again after one week.
  • What to say: After interviewing with a family for a job as a caregiver, send a customized thank you note immediately after the interview. Some believe a handwritten note is the best choice, as it shows how personally invested you’ll be as a caregiver. End the note with a statement that invites future conversation, such as “I am looking forward to hearing from you soon.” If you don’t hear anything, send another follow-up message one week later.
  • Why it’s important: Engaging the family this way will help you stand out from other candidates.

 
Also Make Sure You:

  • Check Details: 
Your follow-up messages are just as important as your profile and job application, and you should treat them with the same care. Read over the text to make sure it’s clear, in proper English and free of spelling and grammar mistakes.
  • Stay Formal:
 When you first apply to a job on Care.com, you may only know the employer’s first name — or no name at all. You should still address any messages formally, starting them with “Dear Anna” or “Dear Employer.” Once you hear from the family and find out their last name, use it — along with any formal titles (like Dr., Mr., Mrs. or Ms.). This shows respect and demonstrates that you’re a professional. Only use first names if the family asks you to.
  • Make it Personal:
 These messages shouldn’t be generic ones that you could send to anyone. They should be specific to the job you’re applying for.
Once you know the children’s names, use them in your letters and mention any personality traits or interests you have learnt about. This will show you value each child as an individual.
  • Expand on Your Conversation:
 Once you’ve met or spoken to a family, use the follow-up note to add more details about something you discussed or a part of your background the family seemed interested in or hesitant about. This shows potential employers that you pay attention to details and helps you stand out as a superior applicant.

 

Your Next Steps

 

 



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